Grocery Price Inflation In MD Among Worst In Nation

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In Maryland, inflation is causing food prices to spike faster here than in most U.S. states, according to a new report. A grocery aisle is pictured above (Caren Lissner/Patch)

Patch reporter Megan VerHelst originally posted this story.

MARYLAND — Shoppers nationwide know it costs a lot more to fill up a grocery cart today than it used to. But in Maryland, inflation is causing food prices to spike faster here than in most U.S. states, according to a new report.

A recently released report by Consumer Affairs found grocery prices nationwide were 5.3 percent higher in November than a year ago. While a dramatic improvement from 2022 — over two years, prices have spiked 25.5 percent — where you live plays a big role in how much shoppers will spend.

In Maryland, grocery costs spiked 7 percent in the last 12 months, the report stated. Only two other states — Pennsylvania and Vermont — saw larger increases.

To determine increases in each state, Consumer Affairs analyzed grocery price data in 15 categories, collected in real-time in 150,000 stores. As of mid-November, the states seeing the largest increase in food prices were clustered in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states, according to the report.

The states with the highest spike in grocery prices were:

  • Pennsylvania: 8.2 percent
  • Vermont: 7 percent
  • Maryland: 7 percent
  • West Virginia: 6.9 percent
  • New Jersey: 6.8 percent
  • Massachusetts: 6.6 percent
  • Connecticut: 6.4 percent
  • Florida: 6.4 percent
  • Montana: 6.4 percent
  • South Dakota: 6.4 percent
  • North Dakota: 6.4 percent
  • Iowa: 6.4 percent

States with the lowest increases in food costs were located throughout the United States.

Here are the states with the lowest spikes, according to the report:

  • Colorado: 2.9 percent
  • Arizona: 3.3 percent
  • North Carolina: 3.5 percent
  • Michigan: 3.5 percent
  • Virginia: 3.6 percent
  • Nevada: 4.2 percent
  • South Carolina: 4.3 percent
  • Indiana: 4.4 percent
  • Ohio: 4.4 percent
  • Oregon: 4.5 percent

Data collected to compile the report showed price hikes in each grocery category ranged widely, both nationally and locally.

Nationally, prices for grains, beans, and pasta were up 1.5 percent over 12 months. Yet in Colorado those products went down in price and were nearly 2 percent cheaper than a year ago, helping to explain the state’s low food inflation.

Other factors that could cause prices to vary by state, according to experts who spoke with Consumer Affairs, include supply and demand as well as overhead expenses like local labor, utilities, tax, and real estate costs.

The war in Ukraine, for example, has reduced shipments of wheat, which has affected the prices of everything from bread and crackers to cereal, according to the report.

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Were you expecting something different Fletch ? Maryland wants to be
like California so bad (BUT that'll NEVER work. Ca has Hollywood, we
have Baltimore crime ☹️ ) MD residents are dumb and makes NO SENSE. It
doesn't know what to do, so it follows in their footsteps. 👎

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I have no idea where this author gets his information or shops.   I have 3 grocery stores in my area.  Prices are down to pre-pandemic prices in everything I buy like eggs, milk, chicken  etc...  

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Bull!  Not only have the prices on everything shot up (I'm talking a LOT of times up to 25% and more) but also if you want a certain particular product that pre-pandemic was never an issue (unless there was a blizzard coming the next day) you're out of luck . And the Politicians (or in this case the Councilman )  did do something about it, they figured out a way to screw you even more by ripping you off by charging you for your grocery bags!

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